b1jam1

Benjamin Josse Josse từ Santa Rosa do Sul - SC, Braxin từ Santa Rosa do Sul - SC, Braxin

Người đọc Benjamin Josse Josse từ Santa Rosa do Sul - SC, Braxin

Benjamin Josse Josse từ Santa Rosa do Sul - SC, Braxin

b1jam1

Tôi không chắc tại sao tôi lại chờ đợi lâu để đọc tác phẩm kinh điển này! Tôi hoàn toàn thích nó .... và tôi thậm chí có thể thấy mình đọc đi đọc lại nhiều lần ....... nó được viết hoàn hảo theo mọi cách.

b1jam1

A satisfying end to a wonderful trilogy. What do I do now that I've finished it? Well, move on to some other wonderful books, of course. But let's rewind here to take a look at the stars. Mikael Blomkvist. Millennium reporter and womanizer extraordinaire. Quick thinker, but sometimes dwells too much on a particular subject. Problem-solver. He'll resort to making a deal with someone to get information that he needs...and then perhaps find a loophole to break that deal. An all-around good guy. He's our male hero of the series. The majority of his character development, I should say, happened in the first book, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. It is in that story that we first meet him under severe circumstances, where he is convicted of libel and pretty much falls off the face of the earth...for a while. But after solving a mystery that has haunted the town of Hedestad for decades, he suddenly becomes the person to turn to (for the reader). He's the one with the guts to do things we might not otherwise do. In the next two installments in the Millennium series, he's at least consistent with his personality. He's still a womanizer. He still cares a great deal for his friends. And he will still stop at nothing to protect those he cares about. But if I did have to pick one aspect about his character that develops over the course of the last book, it would be in the fact that he finally finds a love interest that can ground him a bit. I did find their meeting and slow process of falling in love to be pushing it a bit, but at least he was still in character. If there had been more books, it's likely that this relationship could have developed a bit more. Next main character: Lisbeth Salander. The social recluse. The psychopath killer. The S&M lesbian satanist. The victim. Whatever you want to label her, she really doesn't give a shhh. She's her own person, and very proud to be that. If you've watched the movie(s), the character of Lisbeth is portrayed really well. But if you really want to feel how she feels and get a sense of how much of an individual she is, then reading the book is a much better option. One part that stands out in the reflection of her individuality is during the climax of the book when the characters are in court, and she accentuates her individualism. There's really no stopping her. I felt that the development of Salander was the greatest in this last installment, a nice foil in contrast to Blomkvist. Throughout the series, Salander acts as the strong, female character. She can do anything. She has a photographic memory. She can hack computers like nobody's business. And she can pummel a man who's three times her size. She doesn't need any help, does she? In these cases, no. But nobody is invincible, not even Lisbeth. She has her doubts, of course. When all these knights in shining armor come to her rescue, she wants nothing to do with them. "According to Giannini, both of them said they would be in her corner, but those were words. They could not do anything to solve her private problems." Or so she thought. Throughout this story, Lisbeth learned something that she had lost since childhood: trust. Yes, society does sometimes turn its back on us. Yes, there's shady business going on in the world beyond our grasp, in a government run by those who lambaste the truth. But you have to admit, not every single soul is like that. And if there's one thing that she could learn to remove her from the shackles of disdain and suspicion, it's accepting those who want to help her: "She had decided that for once she was going to do as he advised. She would test the system. Blomkvist had convinced her that she had nothing to lose, and he was offering her a chance to escape in a very different way. If the plan failed, she would simply have to plot her escape from St. Stefan's or whichever other nuthouse they put her in." Ok...maybe she didn't have complete trust yet, but was getting there. What Lisbeth represents is a group of people who are victims of the system. Although her case might be just a tad bit extreme, there are those out there that are in circumstances that are far worse than one can imagine. In a society where evils and atrocities happen, what do we do? She we turn a blind eye to it, and hope it doesn't affect us directly? Lisbeth is a strong character who takes matters into her own hands, in more instances than one. But she learns from her mistakes. But remember, she's not the only hero in the story! Stieg Larsson presents with two of them: Salander and Blomkvist. You may be the victim, or you may be the bystander. But no matter which one you are, there's still something you can do. Just do it. Now let's move on to plot. Was it believable? Just barely. Did I care? Of course not! In the first book, there was a single antagonist who perpetrated violence against some women. In the second book, it was a whole trafficking scenario, a systemized form of violence against women. But in the third book, it gets even bigger: "One more thing. We're no longer in a battle with a gang of criminals; this time it's with a government department. It's going to be tough." Blomkvist is right. It's a whole different ballgame here. It's a lot bigger in scope, and there are a lot of different parties involved. Luckily, it doesn't get too convoluted. Granted, some unnecessary characters are killed off so there aren't too many people running around. Still, I enjoyed the story because of the fact that it's a story. Crazy things have got to happen in a good book, right? Overall, I've got to say that I thoroughly enjoyed the series. I wish there could have been more, but unfortunately the author has since passed away. Rest in peace Stieg Larsson.

b1jam1

You probably don't want to read this if you're squemish. This is a book on the various uses of corpses in criminal, medical and other types of studies. Its detailed and interesting and manages to remain respectful of the dead while having a sense of humour.

b1jam1

I really like this book. I will come back later and update my details :)